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Art Collector

Elusive, Captivating – and Born From Rainbows

It’s hard to pin down how a painting is conjured into existence. It starts with a microscopic dot of inspiration that begins swirling around in the back of the artist’s mind before coming to life in a psychedelic explosion of creativity. Whether the finished art piece is a colorful abstract display or a somber street scene in gray-scale, it has a story to tell. And in each story, a small aspect of the artist is revealed. Each stroke forms part of a complex and enormously personal adventure.

Contrast – In Reflection of Organized Chaos

The thought process and emotional journey of creating this particular piece involved intense layering and deep strokes to reveal gentle colors. Just like the emotional journey of the piece, the first layer was energetic and bright – almost gaudy. Then, as I became more pensive, the painting became more subdued. An opaque layer gave it an air of mystery before bold eliminating strokes deftly dragged the first layer to merge with the second. The unification of both layers divulged gentle splashes of color. Despite the chaos of its inception, the process ultimately resulted in a quiet work, a piece that seeks to invoke a feeling of peace and serenity resembling a reflection in the water, or perhaps a distant memory…

Just Like The Inception of Life

When we are born, everything is bright, new and colorful. Then – even though layers of life change the picture of our existence, the original (and true?) colors still find their way to the surface. Like life, art is dependent on love and sincerity – it is not only about hard work and time. What makes a work of art truly exceptional simply cannot be decided by the obvious, it is not how many hours were spent on creating the work. No matter how many strokes you lay down on that canvas, if they are not done with heart (love), and if they are not honest, the piece will ultimately fall flat. Think of Pablo Picasso who said, ‘It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child’. Painting with love and sincerity is painting like a child… freely, with abandon, and with joy. After all, art comes from one place – the heart.

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Art Collector

oil painting - by Sharone Perlstein

It’s hard to pin down how a painting is conjured into existence. It starts with a microscopic dot of inspiration that begins swirling around in the back of the artist’s mind before coming to life in a

 psychedelic explosion of creativity. Whether the finished art piece is a colorful abstract display or a somber street scene in gray-scale, it has a story to tell. And in each story, a small aspect of the artist is revealed. Each stroke forms part of a complex and enormously personal adventure.

Contrast – In Reflection of Organized Chaos

The thought process and emotional journey of creating this particular piece involved intense layering and deep strokes to reveal gentle colors. Just like the emotional journey of the piece, the first layer was energetic and bright – almost gaudy. Then, as I became more pensive, the painting became more subdued. An opaque layer gave it an air of mystery before bold eliminating strokes deftly dragged the first layer to merge with the second. The unification of both layers divulged gentle splashes of color. Despite the chaos of its inception, the process ultimately resulted in a quiet work, a piece that seeks to invoke a feeling of peace and serenity resembling a reflection in the water, or perhaps a distant memory…

Just Like The Inception of Life

Oil painting - by Sharone Perlstein

When we are born, everything is bright, new and colorful. Then – even though layers of life change the picture of our existence, the original (and true?) colors still find their way to the surface. 

Like life, art is dependent on love and sincerity – it is not only about hard work and time. What makes a work of art truly exceptional simply cannot be decided by the obvious, it is not how many hours were spent on creating the work. No matter how many strokes you lay down on that canvas, if they are not done with heart (love), and if they are not honest, the piece will ultimately fall flat. Think of Pablo Picasso who said, ‘It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child’. Painting with love and sincerity is painting like a child… freely, with abandon, and with joy. After all, art comes from one place – the heart.

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Art Collector

Beyond the Aesthetic of Minimalism

Post-Minimalism can be a hard concept to pin down. That’s largely because the term refers not so much to a single, unified aesthetic as to a range of interrelated styles that arose during the late 1960s in the aftermath of Minimalism. Although the different strands of Post-Minimalism overlap with each other, they frequently have diverging, even contrary, approaches and perspectives. Within this broad church, for example, we find not only conceptual painting, sculpting, and photography but also performance art, process art, body art, and site-specific art.

What is the “Post” in Post-Minimalism?

When we try to sum up the elusive essence of Post-Minimalism, we also need to remember that the artists grouped under this term have different attitudes and responses to Minimalism itself. For some, the “Post” in “Post-Minimalism” perpetuates and develops the Minimalists’ desire to create works that are abstract, impersonal and have a striking material presence. For other Post-Minimalists, though, the point is to reject the earlier movement’s formality and impersonal qualities.

Some Post-Minimalists have, like the Minimalists before them, played down the intentions of the artists and instead highlighted the sheer materiality of their work. Unlike the Minimalists, though, they have de-emphasized form and composition, opting instead for approaches that allow the material to shape itself by sagging or drooping, for example. This part of the Post-Minimalist aesthetic is called “anti-form”. Post-Minimalism has also changed things by moving away from the gallery and out into natural or less formal environments.

Unity in Diversity

When we think of some key Post-Minimalist artists and works, the movement’s quality of unity in diversity becomes even more evident. The rubric of Post-Minimalism is elastic enough, for instance, to encompass such different phenomena as Robert Morris’s process art, which prioritizes the act of creation itself over its final product; Vito Acconci’s photographic body art; and Richard Long’s walking-based process art, which leaves trails on the ground. Like Long’s art, Post-Minimalism as a whole leaves fascinating trails as it shapes our environment.



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Art Collector

Diversify Your Investment Portfolio with Art Assets

With the return on traditional investment assets, such as savings accounts, bonds, and securities tanking, several alternative investments like wines, luxury automobiles, and art have emerged as smarter investment strategies. Art investments seem particularly attractive, especially in light of recent reports of £37B in global sales according to the European Fine Art Foundation. This tops the record £35B seen in 2007. Last spring, a French Post-Impressionist piece by Paul Gaugiun fetched close to $300M, the highest price ever recorded for a piece of art. All of this may entice you to run out and start your own art investment career, and while this could be a very successful move, it pays to be cautious and conduct a very thorough and realistic assessment of the market. Some numbers may be inflated and some of the recent investment returns may be short-lived. In fact, if you ask around, there are mixed reviews and conflicting advice. Therefore, patience and homework are key tools to building a successful art investment portfolio.

Invest or Don’t Invest

Most financial planners steer clients away from art, preferring to keep them in more liquid assets, something you can sell when you need to. While your art collection may bring you a good price, if what you own is not hot in the market right now, you will have to wait for a buyer. The volatility of the market is very much tied to the condition of the economic environment, which artists are popular, what technique or medium is trending, and a host of other factors that could slow down your ability to turn around some cash. These factors also impact the growth of your investment. Furthermore, art is not regulated, as are other assets, so as an investor you cannot rely on any compensation or protection should something go wrong. As a final note, financial planners will tell you that there are significant upfront costs involved in purchasing your art, beyond the sticker price, such as appraisal fees, insurance, transaction fees, perhaps storage and delivery, and resale fees. Nevertheless, art is a very good asset to include in a diversified investment portfolio. If you are investing for the long-term, and you like art, then it makes perfect sense. Analysts at JP Morgan say that art investments perform particularly well during periods of high inflation. Of course, there are always those special gems, such as Garguin, that buck all the trends and predictions. Buy what you can afford, art that you love, and be prepared for the possibility that you might hold on to it for longer than you anticipated. As long as it brings you pleasure and you are under no pressure to liquidate assets, investing in art can be a wise decision.

Ready to Jump In?

You can be an art investor without personally purchasing works of art. You can join a consortium of art fund investors. Or, if you are ready to start your own collection, explore the many online art fairs and auction houses. According to some private banks, the best art investment is currently in Chinese art, which has almost doubled in value since 2008, out-performing all other fine art. If Chinese art appeals to you, it is well worth it to add some pieces to your investment collection, or join a Chinese art investment fund.
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Art Collector
[md_text md_text_title1=”” md_text_title_description=”” md_text_title_separator=”no” md_title_bottom_space_description=”” md_text_desc_google_fonts=”font_family:Roboto%3Aregular%2C100%2C100italic%2C300%2C300italic%2Citalic%2C500%2C500italic%2C700%2C700italic%2C900%2C900italic|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”]Most financial experts agree that the three best places to invest your money are: (1) in your home; (2) gold; and (3) art. The reason these are good investments is that over the long-term, the risk of losing your money is slim and, even better, your investment will grow. Here we will discuss the strategies of investing in art.

Be Careful and Do Your Research

Art is like that house you might buy. If you buy in the wrong neighborhood, you could lose money. The art market is capricious and what seems like a great investment today could prove to be a lemon tomorrow. Educate yourself first and foremost in the subject of art and do lots of research on artists, art mediums and techniques, galleries, and sales before you begin to build your art collection. keep reading
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Art Collector

Exploring the Significance of a Work of Art

When you are buying art for your collection, it is vital that you get familiar with the artwork. The first step in getting closely acquainted with a beautiful piece is to compare it to other works by the same artist. Do your research by searching for the artist online, in catalogs, or in person. By knowing the full range of the artist’s work you will better understand the piece you are interested in. This is the very reason behind solo shows held by galleries; the morepieces buyers can see, the better informed they will be about the artist.    

Look Carefully, and Look Again

The second step is to carefully inspect the artwork you are interested in. Don’t just look at the picture, but explore the front, the back, sides, edges, dates, signatures, labels, construction, frames, and anything else you can find. This can turn out to be a fascinating exercise while also giving insight into the piece. Here are a few other things to consider:   1. Originality Ask if the art is original or mechanically reproduced. This is particularly important when it comes to limited edition prints because many are just digital reproductions done by commercial companies, and not the artist.   2. Major or Minor Find out whether the work is considered ‘major’ or ‘minor’. The more complex and labor-intensive the work is, the more valuable, expensive, and collectible it should be.   3. Is It Typical or Not?  
Artworks that are created with the artist’s usual medium, style, and size are considered typical pieces. Experimental pieces are known as atypical. These works are only for the discerning collector who wants every possible piece created by the artist. Typical art is usually worth more.   4. Which Period Is the Piece From? Artists go through phases and some of the periods are better than others. Learn what this means for your favourite artists and how it affects the art you are interested in.   5. Is It Unique? Determine whether the artwork has original qualities or whether it is a remake of other styles that have been produced over and over again.   6. Check the Condition Finally, it is imperative that you check the condition of the art and the materials it was created with. It is pointless spending money on something that has a limited shelf-life.

Personal Significance

After carefully considering how important the artwork is in the art world, also consider how important it is to you personally. If the work moves you in some way, and it is good quality, it is probably worth purchasing for your personal collection.
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Art Collector

Learn About the Artist Before Buying the Art

When you start your art collection and it is time to select your very first piece to purchase, your first question should always be: ‘Who is the artist?’. You can find the answer from a number of sources, including the artist themselves, the dealer, the gallery, the artist’s websites, exhibition catalogs, art reference books, and more. It’s just like any other valuable property that you buy. Take the example of a house: nobody buys a house on a whim without any research. Before you decide to buy a house, you will probably research the neighborhood, find out how much other houses in the area are selling for, and check for any structural issues. It is not that different when you start collecting art.

Read and Listen

To make sure you don’t come away with inaccurate or skewed information about how important the artist or the work of art is, you have to get information both verbally and written down. If you only read or only listen to what people say, there is a big chance that you won’t get the full and accurate picture. Make it your mission to determine the following information from various sources: • The time of birth and death of the artist • Where the artist lives/lived and works/worked • Galleries and museums where the artist held exhibitions • Awards, honors, prizes, and grants the artist received • Other collectors who own the artist’s work • Positions held by the artist • Publications like books, websites, catalogs, and magazines that mention the artist • Organizations the artist belongs to • Where the artist studied

Don’t Over-complicate Things

Once you have gathered as much information as possible, you will be able to make a few basic assumptions about the artist. Unless it is very expensive art, all you really want is a reasonable idea of who the artist is and how significant their work is, so that you can formulate an opinion of whether the asking price is fair. In a nutshell, the more the piece costs, the more established, respected, and documented the artist should be. If the price doesn’t match the reputation, negotiate or walk away.  
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Art Collector

You Don’t Need a Degree in Art to Buy Great Art

Not only highly educated art gurus with papers to prove their knowledge and appreciation of fine art can collect artworks – anybody who passionately wants a collection can do it. Whether your idea of art is renaissance pieces by the old masters like Leonardo da Vinci, abstract expressionist work like Jackson Pollock’s paintings or modern sculptures like Antony Gormley’s, there are at least a few works of art that are guaranteed to stir any art lover’s soul. To start filling your home with artworks that you love, all you need is the desire to collect beautiful creations, a love for art, and the willingness to learn a few techniques that will help you evaluate art by anybody, from anywhere and any period of time.  

Four Techniques to Evaluate Art Effectively

The four basic aspects of the artwork you have to evaluate are: • Who the artist is • How significant the artwork is • The history of the artwork – i.e. where it has been and who has owned it • How much the artwork costs, and whether this is a fair price In this blog I will be exploring these techniques in-depth, to help art enthusiasts learn how to spend their money wisely on quality works of art.

Art Collection vs. Art Investment

Although it is possible for anybody to collect beautiful works of art using this methodology, it is mainly intended to help art enthusiasts pay fair prices for good art – and not people who want to collect art as an investment only. The tips in here are also not meant to be strict rules. If you see a work of art that captivates you, whether it is a painting, a print or a sculpture and you really love it, why not buy it? Like the world famous artist Pablo Picasso once said, ‘The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.    
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